Communicating With Someone With Dementia

Communicating With Someone With Dementia

Communicating With Someone With Dementia

We all need to communicate with people. We need to tell them all sorts of things, like our needs, and our feelings. How well we can communicate affects our quality of life. Dementia can make it hard to communicate, and this can upset and frustrate sufferers and those around them. Read our Communicating With Someone With Dementia article for more information…

Communicating with someone with dementia

A person with dementia often has trouble finding the right word; they may repeat phrases, or get ‘stuck’ on some sounds. People with dementia are also likely to have sight or hearing problems which make it hard to communicate. If someone cannot express themselves, they can lose their confidence and feel anxious or depressed. They may behave in ways others find odd, as they try to communicate without words.

Language problems can occur in every form of dementia. The diseases that cause dementia affect the parts of the brain that control language. A sign that a person’s language is affected by dementia can be a failure to find the right words. They may use a connected word (calling a newspaper a book, for example), substitute words (saying ‘thing to sit on’ rather than ‘chair’) or find no words at all.

Another sign is fluent speech without any meaning – for example, using jumbled up words and mixed up grammar. Dementia can affect a person’s ability to choose an appropriate response because they do not understand what you meant. There may come a time when the person can barely communicate using language at all. This will be distressing for them and those around them, but you can maintain communication and support them. Dementia can affect a person’s cognitive abilities. They may have a slower speed of thought or struggle to understand complex ideas. This can affect their ability to communicate too. For example, they may take longer than usual to process ideas and work out a response to what is said to them. Other factors that can affect a person with dementia’s communication include pain, illness and the side-effects of medication.

For more information about communicating with someone with dementia and how Barton Park residential care Southport specialist can help contact us today.